Features

Henry Eric: Myth and History in the Perception of the Mundane

Henry Eric: Myth and History in the Perception of the Mundane

By Dannys Montes de Oca Moreda
The concept of “the sacred” has traditionally been connected to religion, the liturgical and the world of the supernatural and, by extension, to everything that “transcends” due to its closeness to the sublime, the consecrated, the venerable or the canonical. It is also connected to that which is [...]



Interview with Carolee Schneemann

Interview with Carolee Schneemann

“I began to motorize paintings in my constructions because men hadn’t done that.”
I’ve had this interview on my mind now for several years, and to be able to conduct it at this time is opportune, especially nowadays, with the way that history seems to be repeating itself. Caroline Schneemann’s work is relevant to [...]



To Find Freedom in Chaos. Interview with Elliott Hundley

To Find Freedom in Chaos. Interview with Elliott Hundley

Chaos and mayhem do not immediately come to mind when the ancient Greeks are evoked. Classical antiquity is far better known for its emphasis on rationality and balance, not to mention the immanently sensible quest for truth and beauty, particularly when it comes to the visual arts. But Elliott Hundley sees things differently. [...]



Push to Flush. How New York Lost the Idea of Modern Art…  (On Museums, Collections and Spectators)

Push to Flush. How New York Lost the Idea of Modern Art… (On Museums, Collections and Spectators)

By Paco Barragán
Having been asked to narrate my recent visit to New York to some of its seminal museums, my remarks on it must be taken as biased-in the nature of a reprobation-rather than as the expression of entirely independent criticism.
I freely admit that I gently borrowed the title from French professor Serge [...]



Kettle’s Whistle. Bold Statement and Responsibility

Kettle’s Whistle. Bold Statement and Responsibility

By Michele Robecchi
Ever since its first apparition in the middle of the 2000s, the work of Kelley Walker has seemingly courted controversy. His smearing with toothpaste and chocolate-cream enlarged magazine covers featuring African-American ladies or historical photographs of civil rights fights, it is not foolhardy to say, has generated one of the most [...]



Nothing Meets the Eye: An Interview with Matt Sussman

Nothing Meets the Eye: An Interview with Matt Sussman

By Scott Thorp
When reflecting on a work of art, how often is the object of your attention a reproduction rather than the original? I’d guess it’s more often than you care to admit. Matt Sussman is an Oakland-based writer who earlier this year wrote a series of essays exploring “the aesthetic and affective [...]



Art for a New Nepal: Ashmina Ranjit’s Synergetic Practice

Art for a New Nepal: Ashmina Ranjit’s Synergetic Practice

By Owen Duffy
“If the world has imagined and experienced Nepal and its people as an idyllic Shangri-la,” writes art historian Dina Bangdel, “the brutal aftermath of the April 2015 earthquake forever shattered that dream.” Social media and television feeds have since been inundated with images of Nepal’s cultural heritage in ruins; temples and [...]



In conversation with Carl Ostendarp

In conversation with Carl Ostendarp

Carl Ostendarp entered undergraduate study at Boston University in the twilight of the Phillip Guston era. He went on to Yale as part of a cohort group whose work gave a shot of adrenaline to 1990’s painting. He is an associate professor and graduate director at Cornell University who has had over 33 [...]



Push to Flush. Things You Probably Don´t Know About Picasso´s Guernica

Push to Flush. Things You Probably Don´t Know About Picasso´s Guernica

By Paco Barragán
Many believe Picasso’s Guernica is the most important artwork in the history of art. Why? To put it in Alfred H. Barr Jr.’s words: “What makes a great art work really great is always a mystery.”
Guernica was exhibited for 11 years at the Casón del Buen Retiro, an annex of the [...]



Perspective. A Conversation with Anton Ginzburg

Perspective. A Conversation with Anton Ginzburg

By Stephen Knudsen

Anton Ginzburg is a New York-based artist and filmmaker. Born in 1974 in Saint Petersburg, Russia, Ginzburg received a classical arts education before immigrating to the United States in 1990. His art has been shown at the 54th Venice Biennale, Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston, Palais de [...]